Welcome to TVnewsMentor.com  


This is the way to get someone on YOUR side in the TV news business.

Someone who you have access to regularly, not just for one day at a convention. Someone who can coach you on the right decisions.
Someone who can talk you out of doing something that will hurt your career.
Someone who has been there and can help you walk the minefield of TV journalism.

By investing in TVNEWSMENTOR.COM ..you are investing in your future.

YOU CANNOT JUST BUY A BOOK AND GET THIS KIND OF DIRECT, PERSONAL HELP WITH YOUR CAREER IN TV NEWS!


WHO IS YOUR TV News Mentor?

Ross Becker is a 31 year broadcast news veteran. He began his career in small and medium TV markets and worked his way up to the number two market in the country, Los Angeles. He even spent some time anchoring for MSNBC. (click here for full bio)

"When I started in this crazy profession, there were three people
who really helped me. They believed in me. They coached me. I owe
my career and my professional life to those people.
I vowed I would do the same for other young people in TV news."
Ross Becker

HERE IS WHAT YOUR PERSONAL, AFFORDABLE MENTORING PROGRAM WILL DO FOR YOU.

Getting prepared:
-help with developing your skills, interviewing, "live" shots, writing, research and identifying the real story.
-how to make sure you "look" the part including hair, make-up, clothing
-applying for internships
-how to research a station from the inside out
-the biggest mistakes made by the biggest names in the profession

Here is what we will work on together

THE JOB HUNT
-resumes
-audition tapes
-cover letters
-how to approach news directors
-do I need an agent?
-your writing style
-voice coaching
-which markets are good and which are bad
-what to say when you get a news director on the phone

FINE TUNING YOUR ACT
-how to make your stories more memorable
-how to really shine during "live shots"
-how to make yourself stand out on the anchor desk
-your makeup (yes, guys you need to worry about this, too)
-"the crooked tie, scarf sydrome"
-where to find inexpensive clothing that works on the air
-newsroom politics
-how to deal with a co-worker with a bad attitude
-inside contacts in newsrooms nationwide

MOST IMPORTANTLY..YOU WILL HAVE SOMEONE TO GIVE YOU A PEP TALK WHEN YOU GET THOSE FIRST REJECTION LETTERS.

In short... WHAT IS YOUR NEXT MOVE TO HELP MAKE YOU SUCCESSFUL?
Sign on now with TV NEWSMENTOR.com

DOES THIS REALLY HELP? IS IT WORTH THE MONEY?

Just look at what some are saying about the help and mentoring they received from Ross Becker:

Kris Van Cleave, reporter, WJLA Washington

"Simply put, I am where I am today because of Ross Becker. He"s been there every step of the way with advice, feedback and prespective. And, when Ross critiques your work, you walk away with things to think about. Ross knows TV news. His passion for journalism is matched only by his passion to teach it. You will learn more from this man than you will in any college class and most small market newsroom."


Wendy Halloran, Investigative Reporter, WHNT, Huntsville, AL
"Ross helped me get out of Twin Falls and into a bigger market. He is the best coach and mentor I have ever had".


CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN START WORKING ON YOUR FUTURE...
 
Tip of the Week
 

Every story you tell affects the viewer emotionally. Even the most mundane city council budget story touches some emotion. Hopefully it is told in such a way that it touches the anger button or victory button, but maybe it’s just the boredom button. Whatever emotion a story elicits, it should be an integral part of our storytelling arsenal. But, does your emotional range even allow you to recognize that "feeling".

Many seasoned reporters can look past the facts of the story into the hearts of people and understand what makes them act. Young, inexperienced reporters deal with what is in front of them and report it. They have not yet developed their emotional range.

Finding your Range

In order to begin finding and developing your emotional range in storytelling you have to look back.

Pull out your stories from the past two weeks and look at them again. Think about how you felt about doing the story and then think about how the people in the story felt. Did you capture those feelings? Did you show the quiet frustration of the city council woman who is trying to do something good for her district? Or, did you just do the obvious and show the argument in the council chambers?

Look in the Mirror

How did you feel when your first child was born? How did you feel when you had your first kiss? If we are going to be great storytellers we need to experience life ourselves and then draw on those experiences to make our stories better. So, use the experiences in your own life to begin developing your emotional range. Think of how you felt on your child’s first day at school or when your grandfather died and find words in your stories to help us better understand the story you are covering today. Unless you look in the mirror and realize what you bring to the storytelling table, you will waste your “seasoning” and your story will suffer.

Universal emotions

Conflict is an essential element of most stories but conflict only scratches the surface when you are talking about emotional range. Conflict is the catalyst for the universal emotions such as fear, anger, frustration, happiness, and sadness. Can you show the quiet sadness or frustration of a family whose life was changed by a tornado? They are not yelling or crying or even talking. Does your emotional range allow you to recognize that emotional numbness?

Question the Obvious

As reporters we use our senses to immediately begin gathering information for our stories. But, sometimes what we see and hear is not the whole story. Our own hearts and our life experiences may help us see more of the story than we have ever seen before.
Don’t let the obvious lead you to a story with no emotional range.

So begin developing your emotional range. Start your own life experience checklist. Remember what it felt like to be dumped by a lover or how you felt when you had that car accident. Go back to the time when you got a big holiday cash bonus or when your child brought home her first handmade valentines card.

A news director told me that when he is hiring a new reporter he looks for a candidate with a developed emotional range. They tell more powerful stories, he says. Life is powerful and it should be jumping off the screen when your piece airs. Make sure yours do.






 
 

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